Hospitality staff more likely to experience mental health issues this festive season

Researchers have found that people who work night shifts or varied schedules that disrupt their sleep may be more likely to develop depression than those who work 9-to-5.

Researchers have found that people who work night shifts or varied schedules that disrupt their sleep may be more likely to develop depression than those who work 9-to-5.

The study by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) found that out of 28,438 participants, shift workers were 28% more likely to experience mental health problems than people with consistent weekday work schedules.

According to the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), in the UK, the night-time economy is worth £66bn and employs 1.3 million people in hospitality and entertainment, including pubs, restaurants and music venues.

While 1.3 million people try to get to grips with an inverted sleep cycle on a daily basis, research conducted by drinks distributor, Matthew Clark, found that hospitality staff work an average of 28 hours of overtime during Christmas. This means that the sleep of the 1.3 million people working in hospitality will be further disrupted this Christmas therefore, further impacting their mental health.