Europe leads the way in organic F&B launches

Europe leads the way in organic F&B launches

Research from Mintel reveals there has never been so much choice for organic food and drink fans.

According to Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), in the last 10 years, the total share of new global food and drink product launches with organic claims has risen from 6% to 10% between August 2009 and July 2019.

The research finds that Europe is leading the way in terms of organic food and drink innovation, with almost a fifth of all food and drink products launched in Europe carrying an organic claim. In the 10 years to July 2019, the number of European food and drink launches with an organic claim has increased from 9% to 17%. Current leading innovators include France (accounting for 22% of all organic launches in Europe between August 2018 and July 2019), Germany (20%) and Spain (9%).

North America has also experienced an increase in organic launches. The number of organic food and drink products has grown from 9% in 2009 to 15% in 2019 (Aug 2018-July 2019). While the availability of organic food and drink products in Asia Pacific, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa has risen slightly, less than one in twenty (4%) food and drink launches between August 2018 and July 2019 carried an organic claim in each of these regions. This is up from 3% in Asia Pacific and Latin America, and 2% in the Middle East and Africa ten years ago.

Katya Witham, global food and drink analyst at Mintel, says:
“Organic produce has seen growing support among European consumers at a time of increasing concerns for wellbeing, health and the environment. Our research shows that the European market is spearheading organic food and drink innovation, with France, Germany and Spain leading the way. Although organic products have fully entered mainstream channels and continue to gain traction with shoppers, the organic segment still offers innovation opportunities across numerous food and drink categories. This is especially true in categories where organic claims have previously played a minor role, such as wine.”